Featured

Revival of Spokane’s Late-night Coffee Scene

Originally published in Spokane Coeur d’Alene Living, January 2022
By Kate Vanskike

Dorian Karahalios and Aimee Clark

Creative Minds Unite

Late-night brews, literature and more

What’s a coffee-loving entrepreneur to do when he or she doesn’t want the responsibility (or the investment) of a fully independent java joint? Pop-up coffee shops are one possibility gaining popularity in many cities, offering flexibility in location and duration while an entrepreneur dabbles in the business.

It was the perfect option for Dorian Karahalios and Aimee Clark, artists who met at Spokane Print and Publishing Center where Aimee works with a variety of paper mediums and Dorian teaches bookbinding and digital publication workshops. They shared a dream of opening a place where coffee and creative minds would come together for connection, fueling java junkies and muses alike, at night.  

Their artistic energies in motion, the pair searched for a place where people could hang out to write or sketch. Everything in Spokane (except the bars) closed too early, they thought. And longtime Spokanites they asked recalled places like Mercury and Java Junky’s that haven’t been open for years.

“We’re all old millennials who just want a quiet place to go out to at night that doesn’t serve alcohol,” said Dorian. “We felt like the revival of Spokane’s late-night coffee scene was long overdue and thought we’d take a crack at jump starting it ourselves.”

During the pandemic, Dorian had frequented the Twenty-Seventh Heaven Bakeshop on Grand Blvd – an inconspicuous shop in an angular building that also houses a tattoo parlor and barbershop. When he shared his pop-up musings with Lydia Cowles, the bakery’s owner, she offered her space, which she wasn’t using in the evenings anyway.  

“Who was I to turn down the stars aligning like that?” Dorian said.

Now presenting … Lunarium.

Not your standard coffee bar

If a simple cup of quality coffee suits your evening vibe, Lunarium will fit the bill nicely. There are no espresso machines or walls lined with syrups. There are two options: French press with a selection from local Roast House, or a 100% peaberry robusta from Nguyen Coffee, which Dorian selected after hearing a podcast about Vietnamese farmers and myths surrounding robusta, the lesser-known sister to Arabica coffee. You can also order tea by the pot or Chinese tea, both in a variety of flavors, or a craft soda like peach cardamom.

The selection of Roast House came naturally as it was one of the first places Dorian visited when he first moved to Spokane. “It was a nice dose of community that I seriously needed after leaving my hometown for the first time.”

As for the tea, Dorian said, “We’re constantly expanding our selection with things I haven’t seen in Spokane yet.”

Savory treats and delectable morsels – edible and audible

With a baker’s kitchen onsite, Lunarium’s opening menu offers a glimpse at what is sure to be a diverse collection of options representing Dorian’s and Aimee’s own journeys. Aimee spent much of her life exploring the sights, sounds, and tastes of France. Arizona native Dorian celebrates his Greek and Chinese heritages and the culinary delights of Tucson.

“My home cooking has always been focused on savory dishes and baked goods are Aimee’s jam (pun intended),” said Dorian. He says her scones have the perfect texture, and they pair beautifully with freshly whipped cream and homemade jam.

They proudly offer vegan and dairy-free options, including a sweetened condensed coconut cream for the Vietnamese coffees.

A few highlights:

  • kimchi avocado toast with sweet miso on four-seed bread made by Twenty-Seventh Heaven Bakeshop
  • grilled cheese with tomato-basil paste
  • frangipane – an almond-filled pastry served with cream
  • “Plateaux Gourmands” (French for gourmet platters) includes a pot of coffee or tea and a rotating trio of sweets you’ve not seen at any other local bakery

But simply listing menu items doesn’t do justice to the playful, mysterious literary gifts that accompany them on Lunarium’s Instagram posts. Take, for example, this caption of a star-shaped shortbread cookie:

“To capture the cosmic forces that dance among starlight, said The Magician, you must first begin with flour and butter. A pinch of desire, a dash of salt, the sweetness of a life well lived. And then, they said with a smile, you must release the mixture into the universe, lest you overwork the dough. The words echoed off the walls of The Lunarium, its patrons entranced. With a wave of their hand, The Magician’s empty cup exploded in light, the vibrant colors swirling and condensing to a single, celestial point.”

That was crafted by Dorian, who graduated with Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing at Eastern Washington University. It’s a sampling of the microfiction vignettes he’s creating around a “parallel-ish universe coffee lounge called The Lunarium, which might be dipping into magical realism or fabulism at some point.”

Aimee and Dorian hope to gather any artists who prefer a late-night setting for a variety of expression, including knitters and stitchers. They want you to find their shop “unique and full of surprises, but still cozy, comfortable, and safe.”

“We want customers to be able to leave their cares at the door and be able to breathe a sigh of relief,” Dorian said.

So grab your journal, sketchpad, or yarn, and head to 1220 S. Grand Blvd, 5 p.m. to midnight, Thursday through Saturday.

Favorite Drinks

  • Aimee: a good cold brew with a splash of coconut milk, or an Ethiopian coffee for its fruitiness
  • Dorian: iced Vietnamese coffee, a hemp milk latte or a French press roast with chocolate flavors

Follow: @lunarium.spokane on Instagram

Visit: 1220 S. Grand Blvd.

Featured

Gifts for the Java Junkie

Originally published in Spokane-Coeur d’Alene Living, Dec. 2021
By Kate Vanskike

You’ve made your list and checked it twice, and still wondering what to give an aunt, coworker, or neighbor. Grabbing a Starbucks gift card from the grocery check-out line may be more convenient, but you did you that last year, and you want something with a personal touch for the coffee lovers in your life. Here are some ideas:

Shown here: stainless steel pour over filter, frother, Bialetti Moka Pot. (All are available at World Market if you can’t find at a local business.)

For the latte-obsessed

A battery-operated frother. Trying to make a little latte art at home is fun, and a small frother will fit nicely in a stocking. $10-15

For the environmentally conscious

Say goodbye to paper cone filters and hello to the reusable stainless steel pour over filter. $10-$12

For the at-home espresso tinkerer

Bialetti Moka Pot. This traditional Italian stove-top espresso maker is easy to use, and produces more quantity than a standard espresso shot machine. $30-40

GSI French press, Oxo burr grinder

For the outdoor adventurer

GSI Outdoors is a home-grown Spokane manufacturer of a full line of coffee products for the hiker/backpacker/camper in your life. The Javapress (French press for the outdoors), and the pourover system are both are lightweight and easy to use. GSI products are available at a number of regional outfitters. $25-50

For the coffee smeller

Oxo burr coffee grinder. Opening a bag of coffee and taking deep breaths to inhale the aroma is a sure sign that this person wants freshly ground beans every day. A good grinder is essential. $60 and up

For the mail carrier, dog groomer, babysitter, and teacher

Gift cards are great – especially when they support a local business that’s fueling our community. For your consider one of these regional shops:

  • Sandpoint/Coeur d’Alene: Evans Bros. Coffee
  • Cheney: West Plains Coffee Roasters
  • Spokane Valley & Northside: Ladder Coffee & Toast
  • Downtown: 1st Avenue Coffee
  • Kendall Yards: Indaba Coffee
  • Logan Neighborhood: Arctos Coffee

Want a stocking stuffer instead?

Many local coffee roasters now sell single-serve instant coffee for an easy way to enjoy a favorite blend on the go.

If you’re able to pick up your purchases in person rather than buying online and worrying about shipping delays, you can find all of the above gifts at stores in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene.

May your holiday celebrations bring you joy, and may your coffee cupboard overflow with possibilities.

Featured

On Location

Originally published in Spokane Coeur d’Alene Living, Nov. 2021
By Kate Vanskike

In short time, Spokane’s coffee scene has grown from a small number of sit-inside coffee shops, to a couple hundred drive-through java joints, and back to the development of more community-based coffee house environments. The newest trend? Mobile coffee services catering to special gatherings.

You’ve likely seen the white Have Beans Will Travel trailer, often at city parks, luring soccer parents at cold Saturday matches, or serving up warmth at a local pumpkin patch. But as more celebrations like weddings and reunions commence after a long pandemic-inspired hiatus, new mobile units are upping the creativity factor for catering coffee.

Two newer-to-Spokane options are The Coffee Cart and Surge Coffee.

Valentina Kozak and Evelina Goyko are sisters from Sacramento who have loved Spokane since moving here in 2007. Both are surgical assistants, but they hope someday to enjoy serving coffee as a fulltime gig.

“We love serving people and we love, love coffee,” said Valentina.

She says the pair attended a couple of weddings that featured mobile espresso bars and since they hadn’t seen such a service in Spokane, decided to create one. One of their earliest set-ups at a small wedding near a tiny chapel-esque facility on Green Bluff matched the venue with niche perfection. But they aren’t limiting themselves to nuptials.

“We love seeing people gather together to celebrate special occasions, whether weddings, birthday parties, baby showers, or other events,” said Evelina.

They’re proudly serving up the popular 509 blend from Ladder Coffee Roasters.  

Another recent addition to the Inland Northwest scene is a bright royal blue vintage van named Genevieve – a ’69 HY Citroën van with a ’99 VW Passat turbo engine and a friendly full menu of espresso drinks.

Genevieve and her owners, Bruce and Keri Munholand, make up Surge Coffee. The Munholands, who are newcomers to Spokane from St. Louis, put action behind their slogan, “Good Coffee Doing Good.”

“It’s our reason for being,” said Keri.

The couple gives a portion of its sales and 100% of tips to charity. They have supported causes such as human trafficking awareness, childhood cancer treatment, disaster relief, youth arts, and refugee support.

That’s how Genevieve got her name: She’s the patron saint of Paris, known for her charity, bravery, and impact.

In its first few months in the Inland Empire, Surge Coffee has been at Spokane Valley Farmers Market, and at various schools. Look for them in Riverfront Park’s north bank on most Fridays through November.

Keri says they chose to serve Indaba Coffee Roasters “because it has a flavorful yet mellow roast with all the nuances of the beans, but more importantly, because they have a similar mission to us – giving to the community.”


Follow both of these unique newcomers to the Spokane coffee scene via Instagram: @thecoffeecartspokane and @surgecoffeeco.

Featured

Eastward & Upward: Ladder Coffee

Originally published in Spokane Coeur d’Alene Living magazine’s, “For the Love of Coffee” – Oct. 2021

By Kate Vanskike

Downtown, 1516 W. Riverside

Ladder Coffee Roasters won my heart as soon as it opened a Spokane Valley location. I’ve lived in valley communities for 16 of my 23 years in the Inland Northwest, and while I understand “the valley” may lack the charm of some other neighborhoods, more businesses and residents would do well to embrace opportunity in the oft-avoided easterly side of our city. (Free and easy parking, anyone?)

But that isn’t what this column is for, so let’s get down to coffee. 

Aaron Rivkin opened his first Ladder location downtown on the edge of Browne’s Addition, in a 1904 apartment building begging for new life. Its chic, modern space fits the bill for what Aaron says he wanted to be a “living room” atmosphere. With bright walls, ample windows, and plants draped across shelves, it does possess an inviting vibe. The smell of bread in the bakery across the hall helps to add a feeling of home.

Barely after opening the first shop, a second and unique opportunity arose. As Spokane Federal Credit Union began its rebranding as Canopy, it sought to reach a younger population of banking customers. Inspired by the example of Capital One Cafes, Canopy and Ladder created a mutually beneficial relationship in a shared facility. The East Sprague location in the Valley opened at the unfortunate timing of pandemic restrictions, but eastside residents (at least my husband and I) vowed to keep them going. This fall, Canopy and Ladder opened another location, this time on the Northside.

One might think that the atmosphere of a coffee shop connected to a financial institution could be rather cold or corporate. While the comfy couches and bright colors of the downtown Ladder shop give way to more formal black and white designs in the Canopy business setting, the friendly environment on any given day could include a gathering of moms with young children, or a mild-mannered service animal resting by a student typing away on a laptop. In other words: A pretty standard coffee shop ambiance.

The valley location with Canopy Credit Union, 13105 E. Sprague; my Okie sister visiting to celebrate our mom’s birthday.

Ladder’s new headquarters and primary roasting and training facility fall somewhere in the middle of those spots, taking over the former Vessel Coffee shop on North Monroe.

As for the coffee itself, Aaron partners with Onyx Coffee, which specifically supports economic development in Guatemala, and Red Fox Coffee Merchants, known for its quality sourcing from throughout the coffee belt in Central and South America and Africa. Aaron says Ladder shops offer two types of roasts – the “approachable” 509 seasonals and the Expo 74 blend, and what he calls the “wild” options for those with more adventurous palates.

Extending Further

Aaron intends for Ladder to keep climbing, expanding beyond Spokane and into the larger markets of Seattle, L.A., and his hometown of Phoenix. The brand is already experiencing wide exposure through nationwide distribution of its canned cold brew – available in original, single origin, and nitro. In Spokane, pick it up at My Fresh Basket.

Let’s Talk Food

Every coffee joint has the standard bakery fare, but at Ladder, you can also indulge in some pretty amazing breakfast options. The classic avocado toast option is a strong contender, but if you want something different, try the waffles, available in sweet or savory selections.

While my heart’s still in the valley, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention a visit to the Browne’s Addition location may score you extra points with your partner or friends. The bakery across the hall – Rind and Wheat – will have something special to take home. Grab a baguette or focaccia, and ask the turophile (cheese connoisseur) for details on the many European cheeses available.

Great coffee, fresh bread, and amazing cheese in one place? Trifecta.

Spokane Locations

  • Downtown/Browne’s Addition – 1516 W. Riverside
  • Valley – 13105 E. Sprague (with Canopy)
  • Northside – 1212 W. Francis (with Canopy)
  • Monroe – 2823 N. Monroe

Suggest a Story

Have a favorite Inland Northwest coffee company or topic you’d like to see in this column? I’m all ears. Drop me a line.

Family Ties

Coffee connections around the globe

A company whose name includes “brothers” is obviously about family. But for Rick and Randy of Evans Brothers Coffee – Sandpoint’s most popular coffee joint – that bond extends beyond themselves and all the way to the fields of El Salvador and Colombia.

When the two “military brats” discussed building a coffee company together, they knew they wanted to do things differently than other small roasters. Rather than relying entirely on partnerships with coffee buyers, Rick and Randy sought to know the families running the farms from which they buy their favorite beans.

“From the beginning, we were traveling to countries of origin more than most,” says Rick. “We really wanted to know the story of the coffee – the farms, the producers – because they’re doing 90% of the work.”

They’ve enjoyed their longest direct-trade relationship (about 10 years) with the Menendez family in El Salvador, which has seven small farms. Rick and Randy spend time with the family, learning every step of their process, and cupping samples from 40 to 50 lots of beans that represent variations in shade, elevation, soil, varietal, processing and other factors.

Rick (left) and Randy (right) with a member of the Menendez family in El Salvador.

“We’ve always wanted to have full transparency with our coffee,” says Randy. “It’s important for us to know the producers and for them to know the roasters, to have continued dialogue – it keeps the motivation and the passion going.”

For the last seven years, they’ve also bought coffee from Maria Escobar in Colombia, where the brothers discovered her coffee after it placed in the top 15 in Colombia’s Best Cup auction. They participated as judges and buyers, along with 15-20 other coffee buyers from around the world, sampling hundreds of quality submissions from farmers in Colombia. Over a 5 day period, the judges tasted and graded Colombia’s best lots of coffee, narrowing down the field to the top 15 highest scoring, which were then put on live auction – an event that turns into a community-wide celebration. Here, coffee buyers like Rick and Randy are willing to pay more, knowing that the extra proceeds directly benefit the producers so they can re-invest in their farms.  For the brothers, it’s an investment to ensure quality.

“The families are so overjoyed – it’s life changing for them,” shares Rick. “We have meals at their home. It’s such a sweet experience and really just an invaluable part of our business. We feel honored to share those moments with our producers”

At left, Randy samples coffees for the Best Cup auction; at right, Rick celebrates with producers.

Even the coffees that don’t make it to top 15 sold at the live auction still yield a greater profit to the producers than they’d otherwise see. Plus, the farmers receive input from agronomists on how to improve their outcomes.

For Maria, a relationship with the Evans brothers is like free insurance. They purchase her entire crop of  approximately 30, 60 kilo bags every year at a price premium, whether or not her beans make it back to the top 15 in the annual auction. For them it’s about long term relationships and commitments to the producers they work with.

The brothers have also traveled to Guatemala, Costa Rica, Brazil and Ethiopia to source coffee, and they’ve treated a number of their most interested baristas to the experience as well. For Randy, who does most of the traveling now, Ethiopia (the origin of coffee) is a favorite destination.

Bringing it Home

Once those selected beans arrive in the panhandle, it’s up to Randy and his roasting team to develop the roast profiles that showcase the highlights naturally present. 

“Roasting is a craft, for sure,” he says. “There’s a lot of chemistry going on and much to understand about time and temperature, and how that relates to developing flavors in the coffee bean. I’ve been doing it for 20 years and I’m still always learning.”

There’s chemistry between the flagship Evans Brothers Coffee shop and its Sandpoint community, too, as residents consistently name “EB” a favorite destination for both coffee and environment. The old grainery on Church Street has a rustic presence and a funky vibe where young artists display their work and old men play chess. Now over a decade old, the original Evans Brothers shop is a staple in Sandpoint.

In 2017, the brothers expanded to Coeur d’Alene, ultimately partnering with Bean & Pie on the buildout of an in-house bakery, which matches quality hand-pies and other baked goods to the coffee. More polished and urban than the northern sister, the CdA location also features live music and is a popular spot for people to work away from home.

The third location is in Spokane, inside the newly remodeled Wonder Building on the north side of the river. Life is just now hopping in the rebranded Wonder Market, which faced plenty of fits and starts during the COVID-19 pandemic. With other new restaurants and a family-friendly game center in the building, Evans Brothers Coffee in Spokane is finally gaining some traction.

Getting Here

They were brothers first and best friends next. How would life as business partners be?

Rick, the elder sibling, had been in resort real estate and marketing for luxury properties in Maui, where Randy got his start in specialty coffee, before each headed separate directions to continue honing their career skills. Eventually, both began thinking about wanting to raise their kids together, and looking for an ideal location, which they found in Sandpoint with its skiing, lake and small community.

The brothers were settling into their new hometown as the 2008 economic crash unfolded, providing ample fodder for conversations about what to do with their lives.

“We were riding Chair 6 at Schweitzer and I asked Randy what he wanted to do with his life, and he said, ‘I just want to work in coffee and I want to do it here,’” says Rick.

And so Evans Brothers Coffee was born, with Rick handling business development, wholesale relationships, sales and marketing, and Randy as green coffee buyer and roaster.

“We found our groove,” says Rick. “It was harder than I thought it would be. We learned things about each other that we didn’t know. Being business partners was very different than being best friends, going to concerts and skiing together. It’s nice to have come through, and to be in a place where we each respect what the other one brings to the table.”

Randy shares the sentiment. “I’ve grown to respect my brother even more through this business. I truly couldn’t do it without him.”


Founders’ Faves

Rick and Randy both favor the fruity, bright, floral flavors of Ethiopian coffees. Randy’s current choice is Dame Dabaye and Rick’s is Kayon Mountain.

If those delicate tea-like qualities of an African roast aren’t your style, and you prefer deeper flavors and richer bodies, you’re still in luck.

“That’s the beautiful thing about coffee,” Randy says. “With more than 700 flavor compounds identified in coffee, there’s something for everyone.”

Author’s Advice

Don’t be afraid to ask the barista what beans are in the grinder for making your espresso-based drinks. At Evans Brothers, there are usually two options – one house blend and one seasonal single origin option. I enjoy “testing” the flavors with a traditional macchiato (not to be confused with the contemporary macchiatos full of milk and sugar), and found that my palate preferred the Kayon Mountain Ethiopian over the house blend. You never know unless you ask!

Also, try something new. I followed my stout espressos with a vanilla-mint cold brew – delish!

Pictured: a traditional macchiato at the Spokane location, inside the Wonder Building.

Locations

Sandpoint – 524 Church St.

Coeur d’Alene – 504 E. Sherman Ave.

Spokane – 835 N. Post St.

What I learned about @evansbrothers #coffee: relationships and quality go together like cream and sugar. Via @wordsncoffee.

Featured

Come As You Are

Originally published in “For the Love of Coffee,” Spokane Coeur d’Alene Living, August 2021

By Kate Vanskike

This year, amid the chaos of ever-changing guidelines for business during COVID-19 restrictions, Thomas Hammer Coffee Roasters opened two new locations, bringing the company total to 19. After 28 years as a local independent roaster, its crown jewel, a community coffeehouse, opened on the South Hill.

In bold, black brush strokes on a white wall, lyrics from Kurt Cobain call out: “Come as you are.”

That message was an important distinction for founder Tom Hammer, who wanted to build an actual coffeehouse, harkening to the 1960s metropolitan gathering places that fostered conversation and the exchange of ideas and beliefs. “Especially at this point in our country, we need a place to get together and hear each other,” Tom adds.

He’s always wanted a shop on the South Hill, but the right space was difficult to find. He knew that when he finally got there, he would bring everything he had dreamed. “Like a celebration,” he says.

It would have a variety of good, quality food and a selection of beer and wine. It would have a blend of comfort and elegance. It would offer an elevated coffee experience not available at his other shops. It would be a place where people wanted to stay a while, a place for community.

The Right Place and People

The ideal arrangement came from Washington Trust Bank, which wanted a partnership for property it was developing on Grand Boulevard, and for almost three years, Tom’s team collaborated with others to make it the coffeehouse of his dreams.

For the food inspiration, Tom reached out to Merrilee Lindaman of the longtime favorite South Hill restaurant, Lindaman’s, less than a mile away, for collaboration on his menu. “I wanted to pay homage to them even before we knew they were closing. We were fortunate to have had Merrilee’s touch and her validation.”

He adds, “She’s a passionate, soulful person and if I can carry a portion of that along, I’m doing my job and the community right.”

For the coffee, Tom borrowed from the concept of Starbucks’ Reserve Roastery, calling his line “LTD Reserve coffees,” which he finds a perfect match for the new space.

That space – designed by HGD Architecture – accomplishes what Tom describes as an “elegant Palm Springs” vibe, layering lines and textures with warmth and regality. His favorite elements: the door, a tree bar, and lots of unique pods of seating.

For sure, the door is a statement piece. At 12’ by 6’, the massive wooden entrance sets the tone for customers, says you’ve arrived somewhere special. A live tree grows in the middle of a square-shaped bar with chairs. Customers can choose from cozy spots and small tables, a glass-enclosed coworking space, a counter with an up-close view of the action, or outdoor seating.

Separation & Duplication

The aesthetics are amazing, but the real genius of the design at the Grand Avenue coffeehouse is a completely separate service area for the drive-through.

“Drive-through is just critical today, but I didn’t want people to come through the front door and have the experience clouded by baristas wearing headsets and talking to someone out a window,” says Tom. It was a serious financial additive, as he had to replicate all the equipment and utilities to create that separation, but it was a gamble he was ready to take.

“I like to think that after 35 years, I had one really good concept,” he says. “It’s been a cool project. And there’s a lot more coming down the pike.”

Continuing the Magic

It’s been quite the journey. At age 18, Tom was slinging joe at Nordstrom’s coffee bar, then working at Four Seasons, and driving around with bags of coffee in his car, trying to get businesses to buy wholesale. While an M.B.A. student at Gonzaga, the dean of the business school, Bud Barnes, took interest in his projects. Today, Bud is still a strategic partner, who Tom calls the ultimate mentor in professionalism, business ethnics, being community minded, and having a work-life balance.

“Three decades of tutelage from someone like that is pretty special,” says Tom. “He’s always concerned about the quality of business, not quantity, and that’s led to where we are today. We have more than a dozen crew members who’ve been here more than 12 years because there’s a culture that people like.”

As Tom thinks about the next steps in his business, it’s actually more of the same. “We’re a customer service company that roasts coffee,” he says, clarifying that he tends to avoid the latest trends that  highlight the precision technical processes.

“Coffee has traveled so far and been touched by so many people,” says Tom, “including the barista who was up til 2 a.m. studying before coming in to work. So a little artistic expression needs to be expected, with a smile.”

He adds, “At the end of the day, it’s just a cup of joe. That’s the beauty. Just enjoy the drink, and the connection with others.”


Founder’s Faves

Blend: “I love the LTDs (limited releases) because they’re simply different. But I also love the Signature blend because it’s been with me since 1987. It works for espresso and it’s balanced in drip and pour-over. It’s like a Swiss army knife. I’m proud of it and it’s value priced.

Drink: “When I’m not having a cup of black drip, I’m having a double espresso with a micro dot of chocolate, topped with some milk, so small you almost can’t see it. And always an 8-oz. It’s the exact right recipe for the 2 shots of espresso and some milk.


Thomas Hammer Locations

  • Spokane: South Hill, Downtown, North, Valley, Fairchild
  • Idaho: Post Falls, Coeur d’Alene, Hayden
  • Malls: Northtown and Spokane Valley
  • Medical Centers: Sacred Heart, Deaconess, Rockwood, Providence (Valley)
  • Colleges: Gonzaga, EWU (Cheney), WSU (Pullman)

Featured

Good Food, Great Vibes, Chill Time: Moscow, Idaho

The hubs and I have a knack for experiencing much in a short bit of time. Here’s our scoop on a quick overnight getaway to Moscow, Idaho: heart of Palouse farm country, home of University of Idaho, haven for quiet evenings.

First things first: Where to stay.

Jeff is becoming a bit of an Air B&B master. He selected Paradise View Bed & Breakfast – a lovely home in the country, with a peaceful view, friendly hosts, even friendlier dogs, and perfectly private accommodations. Our suite had its own separate entrance with great views from the inside and outside alike.

Paradise View B&B
The friendly critters at Paradise View B&B

Second: Where to go for dinner.

The maître D and hosts at Lodgepole know my husband by name and seat him in his favorite spot along the brick wall. But Lodgepole has done an amazing job creating beautiful outdoor spaces as well. And it doesn’t matter where you eat your meal, because the menu is phenomenal. We had the braised beef rigatoni with Cougar Gold cheese and the linguini with clams for the main course, following a tasty, fresh seeded bread with whipped honey butter. For dessert, a triple layer ice cream cake with a swipe of thick fudge and sea salt on the side. The Moscato from Willamette Valley and the espresso from Evans Brothers Coffee (Sandpoint) finished off desert with perfection.

Braised beef rigatoni with Cougar Gold cheese; linguini with kale and clams

Stuff to do.

Besides sitting on the patio, reading and visiting with the dogs, and watching the endless activity of birds and hummers, we found plenty to do on a summer Saturday. First up, a visit to the NRS headquarters – a must for anyone who loves to paddle the lakes and rivers of the Pacific Northwest. They have an amazing in-store selection of dry bags and boxes like you’ll never see in another recreational outfitter.

NRS headquarters

Saturdays in Moscow are market days, with the main strip closed off for foot traffic only – the street lined with white tents and vendors selling a wide variety of wares from food and drink to home décor and clothing. If you’re still needing a second (or third) cup of joe to keep you going, Bucer’s Pub is always a good option for a local brew. But on this day, we opted for Panhandle Cone and Coffee, because … ice cream and coffee in one shop?! Yes please! I had an affogato (espresso poured over ice cream) with salted caramel ice cream and the Evans Brothers’ house blend.

Ice cream of dreams, and affogato.

Returning to Spokane.

The Palouse Scenic Byway is a treat to drive, dotted with small farming towns amid the fields of wheat, lentils and garbanzo beans. There’s plenty of history in the area – part of which serves as the reservation for the Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Indians. We opted for a solemn stop at Desmet, Idaho, named after Father Pierre DeSmet, a Jesuit who established a number of missions among the indigenous peoples of the Northwest in the 1800s. But another, longer option, is to drive the vista road of Mary Minerva McCroskey State Park.

Now: Where to next?

Yes, This is Hate.

The Hanging of Qualchan, Spokane County

I’ve always enjoyed driving the country roads through the Palouse territory south of Spokane – especially in summer when the wheat is growing and blowing in the breeze. On one such trip, I came upon a spot at Hangman Creek where a brown historical marker bid me to pull off the road. It was the monument marking the hanging of Qualchan and 6 other Indians by Col. George Wright during the Indian Wars of 1858. At the time, it was news to me, and disturbing.

At least a decade later, I left home on another summer evening to go find that spot on purpose. It’s not necessarily easy to find – either digitally or on a printed map. I was fairly certain I’d find the way, and as the remaining sun left for the day, I did. We pulled in as the horizon was pink behind the pine trees, and the first thing we noticed was the flowers – two pots of red and white geraniums. I was surprised to discover they were real; someone is visiting regularly with water to keep them alive. Behind the stone was also a small trash can and a bag in it, convenient for tidying up the area after careless people leave their traces behind.

But someone has left a number of thoughtful gifts at what had become a memorial at the base of the monument. Lying on a tapestry were sage, feathers, jewelry, a cigarette, rolling papers, beads, and carefully arranged pinecones. We search the car for anything appropriate to leave as a token of our respect, and found a beautiful rock we had picked up on an earlier drive.

My teenager wanted to know more of the context for this event, and pondered aloud why it is that people have historically been so eager to assert authority over others. We discussed those tough topics on the eave of the fourth of July when so many Americans will celebrate the nation’s independence from the control of another. Ironic how eager the colonial settlers were to establish freedom for themselves and so quickly take others captive.

Before heading back toward civilization for late summer-night ice cream, I stopped at the creek and simply listened. I heard an owl, a bullfrog, a marmot, and a few varieties of birds. It was a perfectly peaceful moment tied to a moment wrought with hate.

And that brings be to the title of his course: “Contemporary Strategies for Countering Hate.” I must admit that I thought it was a misnomer – “hate” having become a term used freely in the last few years of social activism around racial injustice. Would it really be about “hate”? I wondered. But after six weeks of throwing myself headlong into research of the Native American community in Spokane – the Jesuit archives, state records, countless history sources, missionary diaries, and contemporary research on documents written more than a century ago – I conclude that yes, it is about hate.

Nothing but hate could propel a man like Col. Wright to commit the atrocities he did. And while missionaries, Protestant and Catholic alike – certainly would have avowed to do what they did out of love, there was hatred for what they believed to be repulsive customs of the indigenous people. What could prompt Governor Isaac Stephens to befriend chiefs like Spokane Garry, to the point of writing friendly letters back and forth, and then to turn his back on them for the sake of property lines? What would cause the wealthy businessmen to commercialize a beautiful riverfront already inhabited for centuries by other people? One could argue that greed was the impetus, not hate, but what is greed other than hating the very idea that someone else could profit from something you want?

I’m grateful for the incredible learning that has taken place through this course. The texts, the honest discussions with classmates, the vulnerable discussion board posts, and the depth of research I was able to do with support from a research mate and a liaison from the Native community. The learning has been intellectually challenging, emotionally taxing, and socially demanding. There is no way to unlearn what has been grasped, no way to erase the truth exposing all the partial perspectives in the American story we’ve grown up believing.

There is no going back. Only forward. The walking meditations to the site of Spokane Garry’s school at Drumheller Springs, the kayaking meditations on the Spokane River, the drives and walks to breathe in the air at the locations of atrocities all around my city – these will continue.

I hope some day there will be more makeshift memorials with gifts of respect at the locations where current-day monuments only tell part of a story. Onward toward truth in place of life, toward love instead of hate.


This reflection is part of a walking meditation project for a graduate course, “Contemporary Strategies to Counter Hate,” at Gonzaga University. Other walking meditations include:

Beware of Suspicious Activity

Trespassing at Muir Hill

Finding Chief Garry at an Urban Spring

The River Speaks

I Know You Broke the River